Is Exercise Taking a Toll On Your Teeth? | Dr. Klint Keller

Dentist Nampa

Can exercise really be damaging to your teeth? Obviously exercise is crucial for good health and your well-being, but studies have shown that certain exercise and fitness habits can increase dental decay and tooth erosion.

Read more if you would like to find out how exercise can impact our oral health.

Dry Mouth: During exercise, breathing heavily through the mouth can cause your mouth to dry out due to a reduction of saliva. Saliva is made up of minerals that work to fight off bacteria, prevent tooth decay, and protect tooth enamel.

While you exercise, try to breathe through your nose and hydrate before, during, and after your workout. This will help to prevent the decay caused by a dry mouth.

To reduce the presence of bacteria and plaque you should also brush your teeth right before you exercise.

Clenching Jaw: When lifting weights, athletes often clench their jaw which can result in wearing down and possibly even cracking of the teeth. Consider using a mouthguard in order to protect your teeth from clenching and grinding together.

You can purchase a mouthguard at your local drugstore or sporting goods store. You can also visit our Nampa dentist who can make you a custom, personalized mouthguard.

Drinking Sports Drinks: The fact I am about to share with you may be shocking, but studies have shown that sugary sports drinks are up to 30 times more erosive to teeth than water.

That’s right! These drinks contain citric acid that can soften the tooth enamel to the point where even brushing your teeth after can cause damage to your teeth.

If you constantly are taking sips of these sugary liquids, you are putting your teeth at risk for tooth decay. Although these drinks taste great, you are better off drinking water instead which will prevent these negative effects.

If you cannot give up sports drinks, consider rinsing your mouth with water after you drink them, chewing a sugar-free gum, and avoid brushing your teeth immediately after.

Physical fitness is important for overall health as are regular visits to your dentist. Increased activity can help promote the health of your teeth and gums. Just as you would check with your physician before starting a new exercise regime, you should also include regular dental checkups.

Want to know more about how your teeth are doing? Contact our Dentist Nampa office today to schedule your next appointment.

Today’s Dentistry of Nampa
Phone: (208) 466-8400
Url: http://dentistnampaidaho.com/
203 7th Ave. S
Nampa, ID 83651